Seguidilla: Poetic Form

I’m a big fan of French forms, but there’s something special about the Spanish forms I find from time to time. That includes this week’s form: seguidilla.

Seguidilla Poems

Seguidilla is one of those poetic forms that started off as a song before eventually settling on an established poetic form. Specifically, seguidilla began as a dance song.

So here are the basic rules:

  • 7-line poem
  • Syllable count for each line is 7-5-7-5-5-7-5
  • One assonance rhyme between lines 2 and 4; another one between lines 5 and 7
  • Pause between lines 4 and 5–usually an end stop
  • Also, the tone or focus changes between lines 4 and 5 as well


writers_digest_guide_to_poetic_forms_robert_lee_brewerMaster Poetic Forms!

Learn how to write sestina, shadorma, haiku, monotetra, golden shovel, and more with The Writer’s Digest Guide to Poetic Forms, by Robert Lee Brewer.

This e-book covers more than 40 poetic forms and shares examples to illustrate how each form works. Discover a new universe of poetic possibilities and apply it to your poetry today!

Click to continue.


Here’s my attempt at a Seguidilla Poem:

The Darkness, by Robert Lee Brewer

When the clouds capture the moon
never to release,
I wander without purpose
solitary streets.
Each song sung in Spain
reminds me why darkness
surrounds me again.


Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). Follow him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.


Find more poetic posts here:

The post Seguidilla: Poetic Form appeared first on

from Writing Editor Blogs –


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: Logo

You are commenting using your account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s